The Moth Heavy Metal & Rock

fuckyeah-nwobhm:

Ricochet: “Midas Light” (Heavy Rock Records, 1980)


Hard to find much info on this band other than they’re definitely of the NWOBHM genre. Appear to have reunited and are currently touring. Hm.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

The Moth laughed for five minutes straight. Showed it to someone else. Laughed for another five minutes. Tears streaming. They don’t get it. Still laughing. BRUTAL!!
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

The Moth laughed for five minutes straight. Showed it to someone else. Laughed for another five minutes. Tears streaming. They don’t get it. Still laughing. BRUTAL!!

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: andbloodneverlies)

Happy Saturday night to The Moth. Mm.  
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

Happy Saturday night to The Moth. Mm.  

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: missveoxx)

One of doom’s biggest bands is clearly called Sleep for a reason.
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

One of doom’s biggest bands is clearly called Sleep for a reason.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: cult-of-the-apocalypse)

"Newcastle natives Venom had exploded across the U.K. in 1981, unleashing one of the most reviled, unapproachable, and, well, toxic debuts in rock history with their landmark Welcome to Hell opus. An unprecedented example of sonic excess applied to the lowest fidelity recording available (or even imaginable), the album wielded its satanic subject matter and uncontrolled speed like a weapon against all that was considered tasteful and refined in music — a true Frankenstein’s Monster, even by heavy metal standards. Needless to say, it was ruthlessly derided and ultimately doomed commercially, but amazingly influential nevertheless, sowing the seeds of much that would be referred to as “extreme metal” in the coming decades. Released hot upon the heels of this first assault came Venom's nearly as crucial second album, 1982's Black Metal, whose title alone still lends itself to the most uncompromising strain of heavy metal in existence today.”
http://www.allmusic.com/album/black-metal-mw0000676301

Lay down your soul to the gods rock n roll!

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: speeddozer)

Witchfinder General - Last Chance

"In their time,
Witchfinder General was considered one of the less-important bands to emerge from the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement, but they have become a popular early influence among bands in the doom metal scene. Formed in 1980 by Zeeb Parkes (vocals), Phil Cope (guitars), Woolfy Trope (bass), and Graham Ditchfield (drums), the band was heavily influenced by Black Sabbath and released only two albums, 1982’s Death Penalty and the following year’s Friends of Hell, before breaking up. Ironically, these became more notorious for their comical covers (featuring the band in medieval costumes torturing semi-naked women) than the band’s raw, post-Sabbath grind.”
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/witchfinder-general-mn0000671244


The bit about Witchfinder General album covers is totally true. Python-esque hilarious. The Moth digs this particular track for it’s Iron Man intro and Diamond Head reminiscent vocals. WG were a pure piece of NWOBHM and doom metal history, friends.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

Quartz - Mainline Rider

Quartz came out of the British hard rock hotbed of Birmingham to join the New Wave of British Heavy Metal movement in the late ’70s. With a lineup that included John Bonham-associate Mike Hopkins and future Black Sabbath keyboardist Geoff Nichols, they were actually founded under the name Bandylegs but changed when Jet Records showed interest in the band. They signed a contract with the label and toured with both AC/DC and Sabbath before beginning work on their first album. The tour with Black Sabbath turned out to be quite fruitful, as they gained a tour manager (Albert Chapman) and a big fan in Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi. Iommi took over the production duties on their eponymous debut, drafting Queen’s Brian May into the sessions to play some guitar. The album was important to the emerging scene, and they joined Diamondhead and Def Leppard in being one of the first bands to make heavy metal faster and less plodding. Quartz stayed relevant to the genre for their short time together, but by 1983 their irreconcilable differences split the band apart. Time has eroded how important the band was to the genre at the time, but fans of that period in heavy metal history know Quartz’s place in the scheme of things.”

Artist Bio by Bradley Torreano
http://www.allmusic.com/artist/quartz-mn0000376304/biography


The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

John Dyer Baizley of Baroness on five life-changing album covers | Decibel Magazine

shellimouto:

gigantorthemooseking:

I once went to a concert with a friend (I don’t remember the band, she dragged me along) when I was 16. They were starting a wall of death and this guy who was flirting with me decides it would be funny to pull my top down, exposing my breasts, then throw me in the middle of this wall of death right as it’s about to meet. When I stumble in the middle and hit the wall someone screamed “STOP! EXPOSED GIRL!” and I thought they were all going to oggle at me. Instead, one guy quickly helped me cover up, three more helped me to my feet, and another asked who did that. When I pointed out the guy, two of them looked at him, me, each other, then nodded and punched the guy in the face before forcing him into the wall that was about to form again.
Metal men are gentlemenly as shit.
This fucking this^^^ 
I’ve always loved this.
I went to my first concert a few months ago and there were these really tall men with black vest tops and tattoos and piercings surrounding us screaming loudly when the music started playing, but then we realised this kid in the crowd had lost his mum so they tried to comfort him and when he started crying they asked him his name and he shakily sobbed “Eliot” at which point they lifted him in the air onto the shoulder’s and shouted at the top of their lungs “ELIOT’S MUM, ELIOT IS LOOKING FOR YOU. EXCUSE ME HAS ANYONE SEEN ELIOT’S MUM!!!” at which point Eliot started giggling between sobs until he finally found his mum while in the air.
Seriously, I have felt safer in groups of death metal dudes than in the group of the preppiest preps that ever prepped.
Now I feel like I have to go to a d metal concert.
Literally every time I see this post it has a different story or two and it just makes me so happy 
Metalheads are my favorite music fans.  They pick you up, they take care of you in a pit, they make sure you’re okay, and they keep a lookout for people who need help.  I fucking love metal pits.

Because most metal fans grew up feeling alienated or outcasted, they’re not jerks who were handed everything.And they are a big group of sweetie pies. My favorite moment was at a Finntroll show where me and my friend wound up right in the front basically getting pushed up against the flimsy metal barrier things. It was awesome but this place was so packed I thought we were gonna die of heatstroke. And then the bassist opens a bottle of water, drinks some, hands it to the guys next to us, he drinks some and then hands it to me.It was like “yeah moshing is totally metal but not dehydration. Water is brutal.”

shellimouto:

gigantorthemooseking:

I once went to a concert with a friend (I don’t remember the band, she dragged me along) when I was 16. They were starting a wall of death and this guy who was flirting with me decides it would be funny to pull my top down, exposing my breasts, then throw me in the middle of this wall of death right as it’s about to meet. When I stumble in the middle and hit the wall someone screamed “STOP! EXPOSED GIRL!” and I thought they were all going to oggle at me. Instead, one guy quickly helped me cover up, three more helped me to my feet, and another asked who did that. When I pointed out the guy, two of them looked at him, me, each other, then nodded and punched the guy in the face before forcing him into the wall that was about to form again.

Metal men are gentlemenly as shit.

This fucking this^^^ 

I’ve always loved this.

I went to my first concert a few months ago and there were these really tall men with black vest tops and tattoos and piercings surrounding us screaming loudly when the music started playing, but then we realised this kid in the crowd had lost his mum so they tried to comfort him and when he started crying they asked him his name and he shakily sobbed “Eliot” at which point they lifted him in the air onto the shoulder’s and shouted at the top of their lungs “ELIOT’S MUM, ELIOT IS LOOKING FOR YOU. EXCUSE ME HAS ANYONE SEEN ELIOT’S MUM!!!” at which point Eliot started giggling between sobs until he finally found his mum while in the air.

Seriously, I have felt safer in groups of death metal dudes than in the group of the preppiest preps that ever prepped.

Now I feel like I have to go to a d metal concert.

Literally every time I see this post it has a different story or two and it just makes me so happy 

Metalheads are my favorite music fans.  They pick you up, they take care of you in a pit, they make sure you’re okay, and they keep a lookout for people who need help.  I fucking love metal pits.

Because most metal fans grew up feeling alienated or outcasted, they’re not jerks who were handed everything.

And they are a big group of sweetie pies. My favorite moment was at a Finntroll show where me and my friend wound up right in the front basically getting pushed up against the flimsy metal barrier things. It was awesome but this place was so packed I thought we were gonna die of heatstroke. And then the bassist opens a bottle of water, drinks some, hands it to the guys next to us, he drinks some and then hands it to me.

It was like “yeah moshing is totally metal but not dehydration. Water is brutal.”

(Source: psihoticno-sarkasticna)