The Moth Heavy Metal & Rock

The Death of Liner Notes Rob Us of Another Great Life Pleasure

After her recent post about guitar hero John SykesThe Moth had the craziest brainwave ever whilst wondering to herself for the 100th time why there were so many references to running around with ‘the boys’ in the Whitesnake album 1987, ie. Bad Boys, Children of the Night. (Besides the fact that any song about tearing your hometown a new one while out with your besties is fucking awesome.) As previously blogged, guess who was the co-writer for the whole 1987 album?? *lightbulb* A very young John Sykes who had just left THIN ‘The Boys are Back in Town’ LIZZY for Whitesnake. Whether taken to mean ‘what’s up, old friends?’ or ‘fuck you dudes, I’m in Whitesnake now!’, The Moth feels it’s safe to assume Sykes penned many references to ’the boys’ based on his time spent with Lizzy, the kings of songs featuring this topic. 

Check out Sykes singing, and shredding the shit out of, ‘Bad Boys live.


And for fun, a great HD recording of Thin Lizzy performing The Boys Are Back in Town’  with Sykes. So lucky to have these recordings from when Phil Lynott was still alive. 


Anyhoo, no one couldn’t possibly know how tickled The Moth was for hours after that little connection was made. hehee. However, The Moth also knows that if only she owned vinyl or CDs by these artists, she would have likely made this connection far earlier, which is how people used to discover all kinds of awesome shit about bands they loved. MP3s are convenient, and cheap as hell compared to buying new records or CDs, allowing music that previously may have gone unheard to be accessed by nearly everyone with an internet connection. It’s hard to deny the value. However, in only discovering new music digitally, an enormous amount of pleasure is lost in following the rabbit hole of liner notes that connects one artist or band to the others we love. To say nothing of missing out on the unbeatable visual experience of staring for hours at a favourite album’s carefully commissioned artwork while listening repeatedly to said album.

image

Especially if you are between the ages of twelve and eighteen, and the album has naked girls on the cover. Lovehunter, anyone?

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All of this to say, it might be time for The Moth to make yet another trip to her local thrift store in search of those buried vinyl treasures. Any excuse will do!


The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

Oh, but… don’t we? 
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

Oh, but… don’t we? 

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: filodemos)

For your sweet, sweet arses.
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

For your sweet, sweet arses.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: dynesty)

Oh yum. Prrrrrrrfect album cover! 
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

Oh yum. Prrrrrrrfect album cover! 

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: 2087)

Head to toe ink work like heavy black lace. Pearlescent skin, crimson shoes. In love.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: marcomonkey)

The Moth, any given Saturday. Y’know, just rolling around in the driveway, naked, drinking wine. Like you do. 
The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

The Moth, any given Saturday. Y’know, just rolling around in the driveway, naked, drinking wine. Like you do. 

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: helloallexposed)

More Great Music Movie Moments From Our Friends
At Pitchfork
Heavy Metal

Heavy Metal: “The Mob Rules” by Black Sabbath

"I don’t know what it says that the image of a bunch of laser-wielding warriors riding giant green bats on an alien planet thrills me as much now as it did when I was 10 years old, but there you go: It still does. That scene is one of a multitude from the 1981 animated sci-fi anthology Heavy Metal that still make my jaw drop—and that has as much to do with the music involved. Heavy Metal, despite its title, features a broad range of pop artists of the era, from Stevie Nicks to Devo to Cheap Trick. But sure enough, it’s when Heavy Metal goes heavy metal that the movie bursts off the screen. The bats-and-lasers battle scene that I love so much not only features a metal band, it features the metal band, at least as far as the early ’80s were concerned: the Ronnie James Dio-led incarnation of Black Sabbath. “The Mob Rules”—an alternate version of which appears on Sabbath’s 1981 album Mob Rules—soundtracks that phantasmagoria of pulpy, wanton carnage, and it does so with all the savage majesty it can summon. And we’re talking Dio here, so that’s a lot of savage fucking majesty."

Jason Heller
http://thedissolve.com/news/3354-more-great-pop-music-movie-moments-from-our-friend/

——————

The Moth is forced to shamefully admit she’s never actually seen Heavy Metal. Feel free to hurl insults, call her a fraud, unsubscribe in a flurry of pompous, judgey disgust. The Moth resolves to rectify this dastardly situation ASAP, however, and will report back with an exclusive Moth Metal review posthaste. 

Incidentally, did YOU like Heavy Metal?? Impart upon our dear metal family your own thoughts about this epic film for our reading pleasure, if you are so inclined.

And now… a bunch of hot naked pictures. Because metal is hot and makes us want to do it.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: youtube.com)

As huge a fan The Moth may be of everything David Coverdale - THAT VOICE - this post isn’t so much about Whitesnake as it is about guitar hero John Sykes, lead guitarist and co-writer of Whitesnake’s biggest album, known as self titled or 1987 in Europe. Starting in 1980 at the tender age of 21 with NWOBHM terrors Tygers of Pan Tang, Sykes tried out the band Badlands for a minute with Uriah Heep’s frontdude before accepting the position of new axeman for Thin Lizzy. Sykes recorded Lizzy’s last studio album Thunder and Lightning with them and toured that around for a while before hooking up with Whitesnake. (Seriously, one hell of a resume before age 24. Oh and what have you done, Beiber??) Sykes then co-wrote with Coverdale most of the songs, and contributed blistering lead guitar genius and backing vocals, to their massive self titled record for the win, shooting them to #2 on Billboard 200 and going eight times platinum in the US alone. 
Too bad he had to piss Coverdale off by suggesting Whitesnake get a new lead singer when Davie took over six months to recover from surgery for a debilitating sinus infection. Wasn’t just Sykes that caught hell, though, pretty much the whole band was fired right before the release of 1987. Resulting in assumably really chapped asses when the record blew up, and the new lineup consisting of ex-Dio, Quiet Riot and Ozzy blokes got to ride the subsequent rock n roll tsunami. Hey, that’s show biz!
In honor of Sykes’ giant badassery that makes 1987 pure, unapologetic rock pleasure (and btw, screw the Zep/Deep Purple comparisons, at least Coverdale came by it honestly for fucks sake - also, not the worst bands to be accused of helping yourself to), here’s a little Moth Metal tip: Do yourself a favor and don’t let Whitesnake vids play any role in shaping your opinion of the band. While they are still pretty great for a moment of historical cheese, big hair and the hottest nearly naked video vamps of the 80’s, they also sadly distract from the majesty, and legitimacy, of Whitesnake’s colossal Sykes-driven sound.Just do as The Moth does: put on your headphones, turn it thee fuck up and shamelessly melt away into heavy 80’s hotness. Are you ready to rock?? Children of the night!!The Moth xowww.themothmetal.com

As huge a fan The Moth may be of everything David Coverdale - THAT VOICE - this post isn’t so much about Whitesnake as it is about guitar hero John Sykes, lead guitarist and co-writer of Whitesnake’s biggest album, known as self titled or 1987 in Europe. 

Starting in 1980 at the tender age of 21 with NWOBHM terrors Tygers of Pan Tang, Sykes tried out the band Badlands for a minute with Uriah Heep’s frontdude before accepting the position of new axeman for Thin Lizzy. Sykes recorded Lizzy’s last studio album Thunder and Lightning with them and toured that around for a while before hooking up with Whitesnake. (Seriously, one hell of a resume before age 24. Oh and what have you done, Beiber??) Sykes then co-wrote with Coverdale most of the songs, and contributed blistering lead guitar genius and backing vocals, to their massive self titled record for the win, shooting them to #2 on Billboard 200 and going eight times platinum in the US alone.

Too bad he had to piss Coverdale off by suggesting Whitesnake get a new lead singer when Davie took over six months to recover from surgery for a debilitating sinus infection. Wasn’t just Sykes that caught hell, though, pretty much the whole band was fired right before the release of 1987. Resulting in assumably really chapped asses when the record blew up, and the new lineup consisting of ex-Dio, Quiet Riot and Ozzy blokes got to ride the subsequent rock n roll tsunami. Hey, that’s show biz!

In honor of Sykes’ giant badassery that makes 1987 pure, unapologetic rock pleasure (and btw, screw the Zep/Deep Purple comparisons, at least Coverdale came by it honestly for fucks sake - also, not the worst bands to be accused of helping yourself to), here’s a little Moth Metal tip: Do yourself a favor and don’t let Whitesnake vids play any role in shaping your opinion of the band. While they are still pretty great for a moment of historical cheese, big hair and the hottest nearly naked video vamps of the 80’s, they also sadly distract from the majesty, and legitimacy, of Whitesnake’s colossal Sykes-driven sound.

Just do as The Moth does: put on your headphones, turn it thee fuck up and shamelessly melt away into heavy 80’s hotness.
 

Are you ready to rock?? Children of the night!!

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

A little of the John Syke’s guitar god wizardry for your viewing pleasure, featured in this grainy but still worth it live tape of Whitesnake’s Crying in the Rain with a sweet little bit of Deep Purple’s Soldier of Fortune slipped into the end. Which is all incidentally getting The Moth far too hot and bothered for 1pm on a Friday afternoon. Fuck it, day’s gone to hell. Thanks a lot, Whitesnake. 

No really, thank you. *bangs bottle of Jack down on the desk*  

Happy weekend, Moth lovers. wee! 

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

A little more about the highly acclaimed fantasy author, Michael Moorcock, who additionally crossed over into the music world by way of the English space rock band Hawkwind (INCIDENTALLY also Lemmy Kilmister’s band before he was kicked out for being a speed freak and formed Motorhead).

Even better, in The Moth’s humble opinion, Moorcock penned the lyrics to several bad ass Blue Oyster Cult songs. Here now for your visual/aural pleasure is a remastered live version of The Moth’s favorite, a fantastic 8+ minute track from BOC’s ever awesome 1985 Fire of Unknown Origin, Veteran of the Psychic Wars, lyrics of bleak and utter despondency courtesy of Mr. Moorcock.

"Don’t let these shakes go on
It’s time we had a break from it
It’s time we had some leave
We’ve been living in the flames
We’ve been eating out our brains
Oh, please don’t let theses shakes go on”


You may have noticed The Moth is also unabashedly attempting to fit the word ‘cock’ into this post as many times as possible. Mmhaha. Cock.

The Moth xo
www.themothmetal.com

(Source: youtube.com)